Autumn Statement 2022: When is the Autumn Statement?

Nov 14, 2022
Author: Craig Walker
Autumn statement 2022

The Chancellor of the Exchequer Jeremy Hunt will deliver his Autumn Statement on Thursday 17th November 2022.  This is postponed from the previously planned date of Monday 31 October 2022.

 

What time is the Autumn Statement?

The Autumn Statement will be delivered at 11:30 am.

The statement usually begins with a review of the government’s current finances and the country’s economic state. The Chancellor will then provide his proposals for taxation and spending. It will be presented alongside the latest economic forecasts from the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR). The full speech is expected to last about an hour.

 

Expert commentary

Our tax specialists will be watching the Autumn Statement on 17 November and will provide relevant announcements on our website and social media shortly after the Autumn Statement is announced. To pick up on our commentary, follow us on Twitter (@Hawsons) or LinkedIn.

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Craig Walker

Tax Director, Sheffield

cw@hawsons.co.uk

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